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Marshan - 15

Marshan - 15
15 m[49'] ocean cruising catamaran

The "Marshan - 15"  is a serious offshore cruising catamaran. The core concept in the design of this boat was total energy self-sufficiency. The boat was intended to have a number of different energy generating systems and therefore required a fairly substantial displacement to have sufficient storage capacity as all of the systems [aside from the engine alternators] were intermittent by nature. However despite the intermittent nature of the energy sources it was hoped that by using a number of different systems the end result would be a virtually continuous supply of electrical energy to the storage banks. Solar power generating panels were placed on the top of the permanent cockpit cover and provision was made for a wind electricity generator and also for a water driven generator. It was considered likely that at least one, and perhaps more, of these sources of power would be operating at any particular time. The boat itself is a fairly usual timber composite sailing catamaran built with hulls in strip plank cedar [or similar] over fibre board frames cut out by a profile cutter from the computer generated DXF files. The hulls have our normal ?underwing girder? on the inboard side to minimise wave effects on the hull/wing intersection and prevent any bulkhead cracking due to abrupt corners. We have been using this technique for many years and have never suffered any structural failures in this area. The rest of the structure is also straightforward. Ply/foam/ply for the wing deck, bulkheads and other flat panels. Furniture and various structural parts such as the soles are in plywood with some of the lighter non-structural components in a paper honeycomb. All these combined with glass fibre of various types in an epoxy resin matrix. The boat can equally easily be built with strip plank foam and glass hulls and foam and glass bulkheads etc. Windward performance was a design priority so dagger boards are fitted rather than the increasingly common [on production cruising catamarans] low aspect ratio keels. A small keel is fitted but its primary purpose is to act as a beaching skeg to protect the bottom when drying out. The aft radar arch doubles as a gantry for raising and lowering the dinghy which is normally stowed on the deck aft of the cockpit. This design does not have our normal access enhancing cut away inboard sides to the hulls down aft. However the boarding platforms are still quite large although not as large as they might have been had our normal practice been followed. The interior layout is fairly standard for a catamaran of this size: four double cabins in the four opposite corners of the boat with three of these having ensuite head/shower compartments. The galley is in the wing and largely utilises household appliances in its fitout.The rig is a multiple swept spreader one with temporary runners only being required in very extreme conditions when the reefed sails require a different geometry from the rig. The main is in boom furling and the two headsails are also roller reefing, with the mast head sail intended primarily as a permanently rigged light weather working sail. The headsails sheet to the aft berth coamings so most sail handling can be accomplished from the cockpit. Masthead gennakers etc can be flown off the bow using a double-ended foreguy or, if larger extras are wanted to be flown, then a prod can be set off the forebeam. The auxiliary engines are 38hp sail drives fitted with feathering three bladed maxistream feathering propellers in place of the normal two bladed folding props. These will give a little more drag when sailing. But more importantly they will give more "grip" when motoring in adverse conditions.



Study Plans available for only: US$30.00

Working Plans available for only: US$7,500.00

 

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